Tenant move-out letter plus two other free templates

Written on August 7, 2018 by , updated on August 8, 2018

Your goal as a landlord is not only to have tenants but to keep tenants (the good ones anyway) as long as possible. But no matter how wonderful you are as a landlord, and how great your rental may be, there usually comes a time when your tenant needs to move.

When your tenant plans to move, you should make the move-out process as smooth as possible. This benefits you and your tenant—when your tenant knows what to expect, they’re more likely to meet your expectations. Here are some templates you can use when your tenants’ leases are about to end.

The lease renewal letter

If you want your tenant to sign a new lease, contact them about two months before the current lease is due to end. The purpose of the lease renewal letter is to find out what their intentions are and to explain what they need to do if they wish to continue to live in your rental.

Tip: This is the time to raise the rent if you intend to.

Related: How to raise the rent in 4 easy steps [free template]

Related: Should I increase rental rates every year?

Note: If you do nothing after the lease ends, and your tenant stays, your tenant becomes a month-to-month tenant.

Lease renewal letter template

Note: You don’t have to increase the rent. If you don’t want to, change that section to reflect the rent will remain the same.

2. The move-out letter

If your tenant decides not to renew and wishes to move, send them a move-out letter about a month before the lease ends. The purpose is to give instructions on what you expect of your tenant.

Move-out letter template

Note: This letter contains language about lease requirements. Make sure yours does as well before you include that.

3. Notice to pay rent or quit

If your current tenant missed a rent payment (or two), you probably shouldn’t invite them to renew the lease. In fact, you should send them a letter asking them to pay the rent ASAP or leave.

Notice to pay rent or quit template

Once you rent your property, you will hopefully have wonderful tenants who stay a long time. But since that isn’t always the case, you can still make things easier for everyone involved if you are proactive with your tenants by letting them know what the expectations are during move-out time.

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